Canadian North lowers checked baggage weight limit

Canadian North is changing its baggage allowance to 50 pounds per bag from 70, starting Feb. 1.

Airline to allow 50 pounds per bag, down from 70

A Canadian North 737 on the runway in Iqaluit. Canadian North is changing its baggage allowance to 50 pounds per bag from 70, starting Feb. 1. (CBC)

Canadian North is changing its baggage allowance to 50 pounds per bag from 70, starting Feb. 1.

Scott Weatherall is a spokesperson for the airline.

"We had to do that as a decision because we have to balance between our cargo and freight and our passengers," said Scott Weatherall, a spokesperson for the airline. 

Weatherall says the change will make it easier for passengers transferring between different airlines.

Leesa Sowdluapik is a frequent flier and says she uses the maximum 70 pounds allowed every time to shop. 

"I don't like it because everytime we go down, we shop for meat and things that we don't get up here, for cheap prices like we don't get up here," she said. "So it is going to have an effect on us that shop down there."

Canadian North passengers with more than two 50-pound bags can pay $75 or more for additional bags, up to a limit of three extra bags. Passengers will also be charged extra if a bag is overweight and there are extra charges for hockey bags.

First Air has not changed its baggage policy. On jet flights, passengers are permitted to check two bags up to 70 pounds each. On turboprop flights, the weight limit is 44 pounds per bag. The charge for excess bags is $75 for the first bag, $100 for the next two. The overweight/oversize charge is $100.

Air North allows up to two checked bags with a combined weight limit of 100 pounds on its 737 flights. A single bag may not weigh more than 70 pounds. Additional bags are $30 each and overweight charges are $1.05 per pound.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.