The principal of Chief Jimmy Bruneau School in Behchoko, N.W.T., is warning parents and other schools about a fight club fad among junior high students.

Teens say the fights are happening all the time — in the streets, in backyards, at parties — and it’s called "bro-scrapping."

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Patricia Turner, principal of Chief Jimmy Bruneau School in Behchoko, N.W.T., is warning parents and other schools about a fight club fad among junior high students. (CBC)

"It's just like UFC, they go crazy and stuff," said Candace Lafferty. "I guess to prove who's stronger."

They're starting early — kids as young as Grade 7 and 8 are involved — and it's not just boys who are fighting. More often than not, it's girls.

Teachers at Chief Jimmy Bruneau found out about the fighting when they started noticing kids showing up for class with black eyes and bruised cheekbones.

This week, the school sent a note to parents asking them to talk to their kids about "bro-scrapping."

"We're trying to get the message out that it is serious and that when you're causing harm and physical bruising to students it is a serious thing, it isn't fun, and that no one has the right to assault each other, friends or not," said Patricia Turner, principal at Chief Jimmy Bruneau School.

Behchoko Chief Clifford Daniels said in a community without a recreation centre or even a soccer field, kids are being kids, and getting themselves into trouble.

"We don't have these teams, we don't have the big tournaments in the communities," he said. "We need more coaches; we need to keep them busy; we need more activities for them. It's very lacking."

Some community members say it comes down to a lack of parental supervision. But teachers hope by bringing it to parents’ attention, fewer students will get hurt.