Baffinland looks at its options after icebreaking plan rejected

Baffinland is examining its options after the Nunavut Planning Commission rejected its proposal to extend shipping of iron ore to 10 months of the year.
A view of Baffinland Iron Mine's camp at Milne Inlet in Nunavut in August 2014. Baffinland is examining its options after the Nunavut Planning Commission rejected its proposal to extend shipping of iron ore to 10 months of the year. (Baffinland)

Baffinland is examining its options after the Nunavut Planning Commission rejected its proposal to extend shipping of iron ore to 10 months of the year. 

Last week, the planning commission said the use of icebreakers would result in harm to wildlife and wildlife habitat and damage to community travel routes, violating Nunavut's land use plan.

Greg Missal, Baffinland's vice-president of corporate affairs, says the company has not decided what course it will take. 

"The planning commission outlined four options for us to move forward with and we're currently considering which of those options we're going to pursue."

One option is to appeal to the federal government for an exemption from the land use plan. 

This is the first time in the Nunavut Planning Commission's 15-year history it has decided a proposal does not conform with the territory's land use plan.

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