U.S. tax bill would open part of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to drilling

The tax bill approved by the U.S. Senate will open part of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling, something Alaska's lawmakers have tried to do for decades.

Alaska's lawmakers got some perks in the bill that passed early Saturday

A herd of caribou on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeast Alaska. State lawmakers have tried for years to open part of the refuge to oil and gas drilling. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/The Associated Press)

The tax bill approved by the U.S. Senate will open part of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling, something Alaska's lawmakers have tried to do for decades.

The state's two senators were also able to get other perks for Alaska into the bill passed early Saturday.

The measure included a tax break for Alaska Native corporations intended to encourage trust contributions, and it struck down a proposed cruise ship tax that Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski said would have disproportionately affected her state.

The bill isn't a done deal; the House and Senate passed their own versions and differences must be reconciled.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.