Middle-aged men are the most likely to die an accidental death in the N.W.T., according to a report by the territory’s coroner’s office.

The report looked at all 879 deaths in the territory between 2001 and 2010.

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N.W.T. chief coroner Cathy Menard says despite what people may think, the majority of accidental deaths between 2001 and 2010 were not among teenagers, but rather among men aged 40 to 49. (CBC)

Chief Coroner Cathy Menard said despite what people may think, the majority of accidental deaths were not among teenagers, but rather among men aged 40 to 49.

"This generation of people have grown up without seatbelts, grown up without wearing helmets on their bicycles, grown up without wearing their lifejackets," she said.

About one in five accidental deaths was due to drowning.

Menard said there are also misconceptions about suicide. It was not most common in teenagers, but rather in men aged 30 to 39. Also, suicide numbers were not higher in the dark winter months or near the holidays.

"Out of the 10 years, the month that had the most suicides was August," she said.

March was a close second.

Menard said one unsurprising find of the study was the involvement of alcohol. Alcohol was a factor in 49 per cent of suicides, 57 per cent of accidental deaths and 76 per cent of homicides.

"We see alcohol in most of our deaths," she said. "Sometimes we even see alcohol in some of our natural deaths, but we see alcohol in the majority of our deaths in the N.W.T."

Menard has handed over the results to government and said she hopes they use the facts to adapt their prevention programs.