100s of Iqaluit residents come out for fresh produce

A large crowd gathered in Iqaluit Saturday for a rare chance to buy fresh and affordable fruits and vegetables. The public market was a pilot project by a group of citizens that hope to continue doing it.

A large crowd gathered in Iqaluit Saturday for a rare chance to buy fresh and affordable fruits and vegetables.

A group of Iqaluit residents, with support from the francophone economic development agency CarreFour Nunavut, organized the public market.

“We thought that we actually need to do something concrete, like an action that people can actually see and get them interested and hopefully talking and involved in the co-op movement,” says Michel Potvin, who speaks for the co-op committee.

At least 70 different products were on sale yesterday.

The committee wants to eventually set up a food co-op.

Iqaluit is unusual in Nunavut for not having a co-op that is owned and operated locally.

Arctic Co-operatives Ltd. of Winnipeg recently purchased one of the store’s two main grocery stores. However, the store is not a locally owned co-operative, but rather a money-making venture for Arctic Co-ops.

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