Walmart asked by Nalcor to turn down lights

A Nalcor executive with has sent an appeal to conserve energy in Newfoundland directly to retail giant Walmart.

A Nalcor vice-president tweets retailer while utility companies work to restore power

Nalcor Energy vice-president Dawn Dalley has asked retail giant Walmart to conserve electricity while utility crews work to stabilize Newfoundland's energy grid. (CBC )

A Nalcor executive with has sent an appeal to conserve energy in Newfoundland directly to retail giant Walmart.

Dawn Dalley, the vice-president of corporate relations for Nalcor Energy and the person who has been speaking on behalf of Nalcor and Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro to the media, sent Walmart a message on Twitter on Monday morning.   

"To be frank, I kind of meant it," said Dalley.

"But I understand it's difficult. You've got to understand for commercial users, a lot of their systems are automated," continued Dalley.

"I was just trying to put the emphasis on the situation that commercial users can play their part as well."

Dalley said that staff at N.L. Hydro headquarters have turned down the heat, turned off parking lot and holiday lights, and shortened cleaning cycles.

Businesses reopened while some homes without power

The call to conserve energy comes after a public outcry on Sunday afternoon over many retailers reopening for business as usual while thousands of homes across the island remained without power.

On Monday, Avalon Mall officials announced the shopping centre would have reduced hours, closing at 6 p.m. on both Monday and Tuesday.

The St. John's Board of Trade has also asked businesses to observe the calls from Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro and Newfoundland Power to conserve electricity.

"All non-essential electricity use should be curtailed," said board chair Denis Mahoney. "Businesses using electric heat are asked to turn down their thermostats."

The organization represents about 900 businesses.

Crews from Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro and Newfoundland Power have been trying to protect the island of Newfoundland's electrical system stable since last Thursday.

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