A co-founder of the so-called "slut walk" against sexual violence says she's impressed with supports and services for victims in Newfoundland and Labrador, and the people providing them.

Heather Jarvis, of Guelph, Ont., is visiting the province as the first feminist-in-residence with the local status of women council.

She co-created the "slut walk" following comments by a Toronto police officer three years ago. The constable told a personal security class at York University that "women should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized."

That set off a firestorm of protest and larger debate over whether the way a women dresses increases her odds of being sexually assault.

Jarvis insists nothing could be further from the truth, adding it's a myth that scantily-clad women are more likely to be attacked.

"People do believe that, but it's complete misinformation," she said.

"Statistically, there is no increase in someone's risk if they wear less clothing. Most of the time, when people are sexually assaulted, it's by someone they know; a partner, a family member, an acquaintance or friend."

Name meant to be provocative

Jarvis said the title of the walk is intentionally provocative to draw more attention to the issue of sexual violence, and to keep the conversation going.

'Statistically, there is no increase in someone's risk if they wear less clothing.'- Heather Jarvis

"I think what should be more offensive is the fact that people like police officers and judges and lawyers think that calling women these kinds of words somehow justifies the fact that they're being sexually assaulted.

"I mean, immediately the name definitely spurs people to go, 'I'm sorry, what are you talking about?' And that's a great thing. People are talking about the issues, and we're not running away from the language involved."

Since the Toronto incident in 2011, there have been 250 "slut walks" around the world.

There are no plans yet for one in Newfoundland and Labrador.

"I think we need to be putting the blame where it belongs, and that's not on the people who are getting sexually assaulted, it's on the people doing the sexual assault," said Jarvis.

"They're the ones who can make the decision to not sexual assault someone."

'Statistically, there is no increase in someone's risk if they wear less clothing.'- Heather Jarvis, co-founder of the 'slut walk'