Rocky the RNC police dog retires

Rocky, a German Shepherd police dog, was the guest of honour at an RNC retirement party on Friday.

German Shepherd was RNC's first explosives detection dog, tracked hundreds of suspects

Rocky the RNC police dog makes his last official visit on the job to Topsail Elementary School on Friday. (CBC)

Rocky, a German Shepherd police dog, was the guest of honour at an RNC retirement party on Friday. 

The celebration, held during Rocky's last school visit at Topsail Elementary, marked the end of Rocky's career with the police force. 

A police dog — like Rocky, who's pictured above — tracked down the 23-year-old suspect to a home in the Leary's Brook area. (CBC)

"When a German Shepherd reaches eight-and-a-half years old, that's usually time," explained his master, RNC Const. Russ Moores. 

"They've got a lot of miles on them by that age. They've jumped a lot of fences and tracked through a lot of woods by that time." 

Moores took in Rocky when he was eight weeks old and put him in police training when he was one year old. Four and a half months later, the dog passed police boot camp, proving he was cut out for the RNC.  

Worked like a dog

During his years of service, Rocky tracked hundreds of suspects and missing persons, and he was the RNC's first explosives detection dog. The German Shepherd worked in all kinds of weather and at all times of day and night. 

Moores said Rocky has always enjoyed working hard, and the dog is having trouble adjusting to retirement. 

"He certainly hates to see me go and he stay home," said Moore. "I always got to kind of block him from trying to get out when I'm leaving [for work.]" 

"You know, it's hard. I'm leaving him and it's hard on him staying."

Moores said although Rocky is still adjusting to relaxation, his golden years on the couch have been well earned. 

Rocky's grandson, a dog named Dyson, will take over the canine job. 

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