The Town of Paradise has issued a tender for two automated garbage trucks to test out a pilot program that would see robo-garbage collection throughout the town, if successful.

Mayor Dan Bobbett hopes the experiment will cut down on workplace injuries and unsightly messes left behind from uncovered garbage.

"One of the things we're hearing about now, and the City of St. John's talks about it as well, is slipping on ice in the winter time and the fall," Bobbett said.

"You won't have the injuries with the lifting and twisting and throwing garbage in the open area of the truck."

The tender is for two trucks with the option for a third.

"You won't have the injuries with the lifting and twisting and throwing garbage in the open area of the truck" - Dan Bobbett

The City of Mount Pearl's garbage trucks were outfitted in 2012 with robotic arms that lift plastic trash carts off the ground and directly into the storage section of the trucks.

The idea was first mentioned for Paradise last year, Bobbett said, and the town subsequently budgeted for the trucks. Each vehicle will cost in the range of $375,000. 

The program will be piloted in a high-density area like Elizabeth Park and a rural area like Topsail Pond. 

Paradise Mayor Dan Bobbett talking about dog poo

Paradise Mayor Dan Bobbett says the pilot program will be tested out in rural and high-density areas. (CBC)

"It will give us an idea on what our challenges will be, if any, and what efficiencies [there will be] in doing it."

Bobbett expects it will take six to eight months for the trucks to be delivered, at which time the pilot project will begin.

If everything goes well, Bobbett said the town will budget for more trucks.

He does not foresee any job losses with the switch to robo-garbage.

Meanwhile, the City of St. John's voted last month to speed up the implementation of automated garbage collection. ‚Äč