There's no end in sight for a state of emergency in Ramea on Newfoundland's south coast, as work continues to rid the town's water supply of salt water.

Storm surges in mid-December dumped salt water into the pond that supplies the community's water system, making it too salty to drink.

'I think people are realizing now that the process will take quite a bit longer than they originally thought.' - Clyde Dominie

Ramea Mayor Clyde Dominie says work has been continuing, but there is still a significant amount of salt in the pond.

"The deepest part of the pond is about 12 feet deep, and the water down to about six feet is good, but from the six- to the nine-foot level, it's classed as slightly saline, and from the nine- to 12-foot level, it's purely saline," he said.

"There's still salt there, for sure. And that was always an issue, I think, with the reservoir to some extent, but obviously this is way above and beyond."

Clyde Dominie

Ramea Mayor Clyde Dominie says additional pumping will start Wednesday, when more equipment arrives on the Tuesday evening ferry. (CBC)

MHA Andrew Parsons, along with officials from Municipal Affairs and an environmental scientist from the Department of Environment and Conservation, were in the town on Monday to assess the ongoing work.

Never get used to it

Dominie said Parsons assured him of government's support, and an expedited process for requests for proposals for sea walls were announced Monday evening.

Dominie said another pump or two will be en route by Tuesday's ferry to the island community,  to pump the salt water out of the bottom of the pond.

While people in the community understand the situation, Dominie said it's still "a very big inconvenience."

"I think today is actually 26 days … I don't know if you ever get used to it, I guess, but I think people are realizing now that the process will take quite a bit longer than they originally thought," Dominie told CBC Radio's Corner Brook Morning Show

"The majority of people are understanding, certainly, because they realize the monumental problem that we have."

The state of emergency will remain in effect until their tap water is the same as it was before.

With files from the Corner Brook Morning Show