Politicians and media celebrities took over the classrooms at Goulds Elementary on Friday, to read to children during the school's Friendship Day, an event that promotes literacy.

The same school will be losing money from its learning resource budget, after cuts from the provincial government were announced last month.

The learning resource teacher at the school currently works 75 per cent of the day, but in September that will be cut down to 50 per cent of the day.

Clyde Jackman, minister of education, said the school should be able to maintain the level of resources for students.

"When we were making these decisions, I felt this would be a minimal impact," Jackman said.

"I was a former principal, and if I wanted certain things to happen in my school, they're going to happen in my school," he said.

"And I worked with learning resource people who are very creative and if there's something there that they need to have done, I can guarantee you they'll find a way to have it done."

The learning resources teacher said the cut means she will have to squeeze more work into less time, meaning students will have less access to the most up-to-date reading material and newest technology.

Dwight Ball, leader of the Liberal party, said the cuts to schools were too hasty.

"Consultations should have been done in advance of those cuts, so that we could actually see the value of what those types of people that we're talking about here today — what they actually contribute to the education system," Ball said.

A total of 160 jobs are being cut from the education system. According to administrators, these cuts will hurt music and physical education programs, as well as cut libraries and computer support.