A cat in Grand Falls-Windsor had a close call with the law last week.

Lainey Lilly's cat, Lovie, got caught in one of the town's traps. 

Lilly didn't know it, but her pet was breaking a bylaw that prohibits cats from being off their owner's property.

"Animal control set out traps for cats, and I wasn't aware of it, and I don't think anybody was ... so what happened is my cat was lured into a trap that's behind my garden pretty much, and they brought him to the SPCA," said Lilly. 

"And I learned, after 48 hours at the SPCA, if no one has called, they put them down." 

Since more than 48 hours had passed, SPCA staff made an exception for Lovie when they realized he was well cared for.

Lilly paid a $50 fine and got the cat back. 

"I was crying, and I was shaking, because I've had him for four years, and he's like a baby to me. It is not about the money, it's about the life of your family pet that's jeopardized, because it's [the bylaw] not really well advertised," she said.

"I think this law should be advertised, everyone should know, because when it comes down to that, it's your pet, and it should be made more public, so they don't find out the hard way." 

Grand Falls-Windsor pet bylaw

Lainey Lilly paid a $50 fine and got her cat back, but said the bylaw is news to her - and others.

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The town of Grand Falls-Windsor posts all of its bylaws on its website.  

Mayor Al Hawkins said the town will not be doing any additional advertising.    

"The onus is on the owner, really, to understand and know what the regulations are. It's not something we're hiding," said Hawkins.

Meanwhile, Lilly said she's going to try using a leash for Lovie to at least allow her pet to get outside.

She's not optimistic that it will work, but she is hoping other pet owners will become aware, so no cat accidentally gets put down.