A Mi'kmaq elder and a Memorial University research professor are Newfoundland and Labrador's newest members of the Order of Canada.​

Calvin White of Flat Bay, on Newfoundland's west coast, and Barbara Neis of St. John's were announced Friday as appointees to the member level, which "recognizes outstanding contributions at the local or regional level or in a special field of activity."

White: vital role in preserving Indigenous culture

White, who helped organize families in Conne River and Labrador in the 1960s into a group that became the Federation of Newfoundland Indians, was cited for his "vital role in the preservation and revival of Indigenous culture in Newfoundland and Labrador and for his sustained leadership and mentorship with the Qalipu Mi'kmaq First Nation," according to a press release from the office of the secretary of the Governor General.

Calvin White

Calvin White has been recognized his 'vital role in the preservation and revival of Indigenous culture in Newfoundland and Labrador and for his sustained leadership and mentorship within the Qalipu Mi’kmaq First Nation.' (Memorial University)

A former chief of the Flat Bay band, White, who created the Bay St. George Mi'kmaq Cultural Revival Committee and hosted the first ever Aboriginal Showcase of History and Culture, is also a recipient of the Order of Newfoundland and Labrador for his dedication to Aboriginal causes and organizations.

Neis: innovative research on work, environment and health

Neis, a research professor in MUN's sociology department and a senior research associate at the university's SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research, is being cited for her "innovative research on the interactions between work, environment and health" in Newfoundland and Labrador's coastal communities.

Barbara Neis sociology memorial university gas prices alberta jobs

Barbara Neis is recognized for her 'innovative research on the interactions between work, environment and health' in the province's coastal communities. (CBC)

According to her biography on MUN's website, Neis has researched numerous aspects of the provincial fishery, including gender, fishing vessel safety, and rebuilding collapsed fisheries and threatened communities. She is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and served as the president of the Canadian Association for Research on Work and Health.

White and Neis, who are among 125 new recipients of the order, will be presented with their insignia at a ceremony in the new year.