Paul Antle's name has been linked with the Liberal leadership for a long time, but he kept his name out of the race until earlier this month when he announced he would be seeking the leadership role.

Antle said that the timing was never right for him to try to get the party's top job, but he said that now is the right time for him to go for it because there is a lack of leadership in the province.

With two children under two years of age at home, it may seem to some people like an odd time to start a political career, but Antle said it's the right time for him.

"I've always been against the grain in a certain way, in creating industries and creating employment, and exporting and doing international business," Antle said.

"So I guess it's characteristic of who I am, but I look at it as, this is a family decision. The province has given me a great deal — this is a great way for me to give back and have my family involved at the same time."

Antle said his top priority if he was elected leader would be ensuring the Liberal party was properly prepared for the next provincial election.

"There's time to fundraise ... policy platforms really need to be flushed out ... there's really quite a bit of work to be done, and any one of the five of us will all have the same list of things to do," Antle said.

Lawyers argue against Muskrat Falls

The 2041 Group announced last week that it wants Nalcor and the provincial government to halt development of the Muskrat Falls site until an independent review can be completed.

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Bern Coffey and Dennis Browne, members of the 2041 Group, are calling for an independent review of Muskrat Falls before any more work on the site is completed. (CBC)

The group's announcement was sparked by the recent Maritime Link decision reached by Nova Scotia's regulatory board.

Dennis Browne with 2041 said the whole thing needs to be reassessed because new factors have come into play since the deal was originally brought to the table in 2010.

"All the fundamentals that were put to our (Public Utilities Board) by Nalcor have changed, and it's important that we stop now and do a complete reassessment," Browne said.

Bern Coffey said the decision leaves too much room for error, and he's concerned that Emera, the parent company for Nova Scotia Power, should back out of the deal.

"They are requiring that Emera have an effectively irrevocable commitment in writing from Nalcor to provide that power," Coffey said.

Coffey added there should either be a written agreement, or no agreement at all.

Antle, Coffey and Browne were on this week's On Point with David Cochrane.