NunatuKavut celebrating after Muskrat Falls injunction thrown out

On Wednesday, a panel of three judges threw out an injunction preventing members of NunatuKavut from protesting at the Muskrat Falls construction site.
Members of NunatuKavut are celebrating a big win in the province's Court of Appeal on Wednesday. A panel of three judges threw out an injunction preventing them from protesting at the Muskrat Falls site. (CBC)

Members of an aboriginal group in Labrador are celebrating a big win in the Newfoundland and Labrador Supreme Court of Appeal.

We have always maintained that this injunction was illegal in and of itself, it should never have been granted, and yesterday we were proven right — and we are elated in that.- NunatuKavut president Todd Rusell 

On Wednesday, a panel of three judges threw out an injunction preventing members of NunatuKavut, formerly the Labrador Métis Nation, from protesting at the Muskrat Falls construction site.

The injunction stemmed from a demonstration at the site in October 2012.

NunatuKavut president Todd Russell said its right to freedom of expression had been denied for two years, and now members have been vindicated.

"We've always maintained that we have a legal right to protest," said Russell.

"We have always maintained that this injunction was illegal in and of itself, it should never have been granted, and yesterday we were proven right — and we are elated in that. What this means is that we basically can go back and protest where we protested."

The ruling called the terms of the injunction "grossly disproportionate" with the actions of the protesters.

Nalcor responds to decision

Meanwhile, Nalcor Energy has responded to the NunatuKavut win. 

In a prepared statement, a company spokesperson said, "Nalcor has established a safety zone for protesters adjacent to the site where people can demonstrate."

Nalcor said it was concerned about people's safety, as well as keeping the construction of the project on schedule.

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