N.L. fog to be featured on Japanese TV

St. John's is notorious for its thick, dense fog — so famous, in fact, that it's being featured on a Japanese television show..

St. John's is notorious for its thick, dense fog — so famous, in fact, that it's being featured on a Japanese television show.

A crew from the Japan Broadcasting Corporation is in Newfoundland and Labrador for the next 10 days to film an upcoming episode of their program about world record holders. St. John's holds the world record for being the foggiest major city in Canada with 124 foggy days a year.

On Thursday morning, the show's director got the shot he came looking for.

"This morning, miraculously we experienced this dense fog, parted with a rainbow," said Tetsuya Akikawa. "A rainbow, in the fog. My first experience. I will never forget that perfect rainbow in my life."

Besides being the foggiest major city in the country, St. John's is also the snowiest, wettest, windiest and cloudiest.

The episode featuring St. John's is scheduled to air in Japan on May 22.

May, June big months

Environment Canada said May and June are generally the months when the fog rolls in.

"The water is still relatively cool around the island in late spring, but the air that we're starting to get coming up over the island is warmer, which causes fog to form," said Herb Thoms, an Environment Canada meteorologist in central Newfoundland.

Before heading back to Japan, Akikawa said he hopes to meet artists, painters, designers — people who may also find inspiration in the fog.

"We cannot see anything. But, we are human beings. We have a heart eye," said Akikawa. "Maybe, maybe if we cannot see anything but we are supposed to see something ... dreams, memories, philosophies, souls."

Around the province, St. John's comes in a distant second to Argentia, on the Avalon Peninsula , southwest of St. John's, which sees an average of 206 foggy days every year. Port Aux Basques sees 97, while in Stephenville fog drops 68 days a year.

Akikawa said it's a scene that most Japanese people would enjoy.