Loblaws commits to sustainable seafood

Galen Weston, the chair of Loblaws, told the 2013 World Seafood Congress on Monday, that the grocery chain is on track with its plans to only sell sustainable fish products by the end of 2013.

Grocery chain plans to only sell sustainable fish products by end of 2013

Galen G. Weston, the chair of Loblaws, told the 2013 World Seafood Congress that his company will cease to carry at-risk seafood products. (CBC)

The head of Loblaws told the seafood industry on Monday that the grocery chain is on track with its plans to only sell sustainable fish products by the end of 2013.

Galen G. Weston, the executive chair of Loblaw Cos. Ltd., made the announcement at the 2013 World Seafood Congress, which is being held in St. John's.

"We've discontinued at-risk species, such as orange roughy, shark, skate, and American red snapper," he said during a presentation.

Loblaws plans to reach or be very near its goal by the end of 2013. 

Weston said producers can either get on board or be dropped by Loblaws.

"When you're in the food business, if you're not sourcing product consistently, safely, and delivering it to your consumer, to your customer, in that way, then you're jeopardizing the very essence of your business model," he said.

The most popular species of fish are already being fished to capacity and beyond, and as supplies dwindle, is demand rising.

Melanie Agopian, Loblaws' senior director of seafood sustainability, said the company has made the decision to change direction. (CBC)
Melanie Agopian, Loblaws' senior director of seafood sustainability, said the company has made the decision to change direction.

"In 2009, we committed to source 100 per cent of our seafood from sustainable sources, so that's across our entire store," she said.

"There's over 2,500 different products, over 250 vendors. It's even products with seafood as an ingredient in it, like supplements and pet food. So it's a very, very broad reaching commitment."

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