Iceberg Vodka distances itself from Rob Ford

A police photo linking Toronto Mayor Rob Ford to an empty flask of Iceberg Vodka has gotten the attention of its Newfoundland distillers.

Police link Ford and friend to empty flask

This is a police photo of an empty flask of Iceberg Vodka, allegedly downed by Toronto Mayor Rob Ford and a friend, before they drove off in separate vehicles. (Courtesy of Toronto Police Service)

A police photo linking Toronto Mayor Rob Ford to an empty flask of Iceberg Vodka has gotten the attention of its Newfoundland distillers.

The photo was included in search warrant documents, and shows the vodka bottle which was recovered by police in Douglas Ford Park in Etobicoke, Ont.

The bottle is believed to have been used by Ford and his friend Alexander (Sandro) Lisi, who were observed entering the park on Aug. 13.

Lisi is the mayor's friend, occasional driver, and a suspected drug dealer.

Police allege they watched Ford and Lisi meet on a footpath into the park, named after the mayor's father.

The men "made their way into a secluded area of the adjacent woods where they were obscured from surveillance efforts and stayed for approximately one hour," police said in search warrant documents.

After the men left in separate vehicles, police scoured the area and found the empty bottle of Iceberg Vodka and juice where the men had met.

On Friday, Iceberg Vodka issued a statement in response to Ford's admission that, "I might have had some drinks and driven."

"Iceberg Vodka wholeheartedly believes that if you drink, don't drive. Driving under the influence of alcohol is unacceptable and inexcusable behavior. We thank Canadians from coast to coast who enjoy our products responsibly."

Iceberg Vodka is named for the water it uses, which is harvested from icebergs off Newfoundland's coast.

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