Final phase begins at former New Harbour dump

It's been a long time coming, but the final phase of covering the former landfill in New Harbour, Trinity Bay is underway.

Former landfill site one of the most notorious in province; PCBs and toxic chemicals buried

The final phase of covering what was one of the most notorious dumps in Newfoundland and Labrador has begun. (CBC)

It's been a long time coming, but the final phase of covering the former dump in the Trinity Bay community of New Harbour is underway.

The dump closed in 2009, but it left behind an environmental mess that dates back to the early 1990s. 

PCBs, motor oil, heavy metals, medical waste, dioxins, and furans are all buried under a thick cover of fill.

Not everyone, however, is convinced all the problems have been solved. 

Area resident Alan Williams doesn't believe a liner can contain the toxic waste that is buried in the former New Harbour landfill. (CBC)

Area resident Alan Williams is far from convinced. 

Williams was the person who initially raised the alarm over PCB contamination, and doesn't think a special liner can contain the toxic waste buried in the dump. 

A consultant hired by the Newfoundland and Labrador government recently concluded that once capped, the dump should pose no risk to human health and the environment.

You know, by the time this causes a problem —where the hell are they going to be?- Alan Williams 

Williams disagrees.  

"Well, they can say what they like," said Williams.

"And you got the current crop of politicians and everything else. You know, by the time this causes a problem — where the hell are they going to be?"

Williams said he believes there has been too much focus on the PCBs and not enough on the other toxic waste.

He also claims that some of the conclusions were based on improper sampling and testing in the past, and has concerns about accountability further down the road.     

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