Father found guilty on confinement charges, cleared on others

A Conception Bay North father accused in a child abuse case was convicted on counts of forcible confinement, but acquitted on charges of corrupting morals and invitation to sexual touching.

Conception Bay North dad acquitted on multiple charges

The father in a child abuse case in Conception Bay North was convicted on multiple charges of forcible confinement at a Harbour Grace court on Friday. He cannot be identified due to a publication ban intended to protect the identities of the children involved. (Chris O'Neil Yates/CBC)

A Conception Bay North father accused in a child abuse case was convicted on counts of forcible confinement, but acquitted on charges of corrupting morals and invitation to sexual touching.

Judge Jacqueline Brazil in Harbour Grace found the father guilty on seven counts of forcible confinement.

He was also found guilty on one charge of "wilfully contributing to a child being a child in need of protective intervention."

The father cannot be identified because of a publication ban intended to protect the identity of the children involved in the case.

Brazil said evidence was inconsistent and unreliable in relation to the charge of corrupting morals.

The father was also acquitted of invitation to sexual touching.

According to Brazil, the children's statements had too many inconsistencies to be reliable, and at times it was difficult to discern whether they were recounting their own experience of things they were told.

The judge said the man was seen as an ally by the children in protecting them from their mother. She said he tried to protect them, but he was a "weak parent."

The mother of the children was convicted of hitting and kicking the children repeatedly over many years, and forcing them to watch her have sex with her husband.

She was found guilty of 20 child abuse charges, and is waiting for a sentencing hearing in September.

The man is not being held in custody, and will be back in court in Harbour Grace on Sept. 30 for sentencing.

With files from Chris O'Neill-Yates