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Dawe's Pond man uses wind, solar panels to power home

A man in central Newfoundland didn't have to deal with any power loss this past week during the outages across Newfoundland by powering his home using wind and solar energy.
A man in Dawe's Pond powers his home with solar panels and a wind turbine, reports Lindsay Bird 2:06

A man in central Newfoundland didn't have to deal with any power loss this past week during the outages across Newfoundland because he powered his home using wind and solar energy.

Ted Pelley, in Dawe's Pond, said he's set up his home to run solely off power gathered through solar panels and a wind turbine.

The home system cost around $30,000 to set up, but he said the investment will pay for itself in four years. Power from the panels and turbine are stored in batteries that can run his home for three days.

Pelley said everything that's plugged into an outlet in your home is using up power, even when it's turned off.

"The satellite and even the TV, even when it's turned off it's drawing 20 watts, and the same thing with the internet, it's 25 watts. So when it's not in use, pull the plug," he said.

Pelley said coming up with a new way to power the province is the best solution to the massive outages.

"It's sad that the power depends so much on those big generators, those fuel-burning generators, and I think that Muskrat Falls is much like what I got here," he said.

"Once that goes ahead, it's going to be a wonderful thing. It's going to cost a lot of money to do it, but once it's done, it's done."

Pelley uses a woodstove to heat his home, and said he has a backup generator in case of emergencies, but that he only puts about $100 into it per year.

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