The Quebec community of Blanc Sablon is talking about joining Newfoundland and Labrador.

The small community sits on the Quebec side of the border with the only road link to the rest of the world through Labrador via the Trans-Labrador highway.

"We think seriously about [bringing] national and international pressure, asking to be linked with Newfoundland instead of Quebec," said Mayor Armand Joncas.

blanc-sablon-map

This map shows the community of Blanc Sablon in relation to Newfoundland and Labrador. (Google Maps)

​Joncas said the residents of the Lower North Shore, who he said identify more with Newfoundlanders and Labradorians, are fed up with the way they're being treated by Quebec, including not following through on a promise to build a road link to connect them to the rest of the province.

According to Joncas, requests to the Quebec government go unanswered on a regular basis.

"The last five years, it's kind of like deaf ears to our requests to the government," he said. "We're considered the third world of Quebec. We are left to one side."

Cultural connections

Vicki Driscoll, director of Blanc Sablon's Community Economic Development and Employability Corporation, while not directly asked about separation from Quebec, said most of the heritage of the Lower North Shore population comes from Newfoundland.

"A lot of people have been imported here of course over the years because of the fishery," she said.

"We share the same culture, we share very similar heritage, our cooking remedies are pretty much the same, our thoughts, our connections to our roots. We're very proud of who we are." 

When Quebec Premier Phillippe Coulliard was asked about the idea Tuesday afternoon, he said Quebec isn't moving the border.

Clarifications

  • Some readers may have been led to believe that Vicki Driscoll, director of Blanc Sablon's Community Economic Development and Employability Corporation, was a supporter of separation. CBC News asked her about the historical and cultural connections between the Lower North Shore and Newfoundland and Labrador. CBC News did not ask her for an opinion on the political idea of separation.
    Aug 20, 2014 1:35 PM NT