LIVE BLOG

Jury reaches not criminally responsible verdict in Anne Norris trial

Jury resumed deliberations at 9:30 a.m. Saturday.

Got answers to two questions Friday afternoon and deliberated for hours, but reached no verdict

Anne Norris, 30, has admitted to killing Marcel Reardon by hitting him repeatedly in the head with a hammer. Her defence argued she's not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder. (Glenn Payette/CBC)

The 12-person jury delivered its verdict of not criminally responsible in the Anne Norris first-degree murder trial.

Jurors were sequestered since late Thursday afternoon, and by Saturday just before noon had reached its verdict.

Norris had admitted to killing Marcel Reardon, 46, on May 9, 2016, but her defence argued she was not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder.

After spending all of Friday deliberating at Supreme Court in St. John's, they reached no verdict, and will be back Saturday at 9:30 a.m.

Norris, 30, has admitted to killing Reardon, 46, by hitting him repeatedly in the head with a hammer, as well as placing his body under the steps of Harbour View Apartments and disposing of the hammer by putting it in a borrowed backpack and tossing that into the harbour.

Anne Norris has admitted to killing Marcel Reardon, 46, by hitting him repeatedly in the head with a hammer. (Submitted)

Her defence lawyers, Jerome Kennedy and Rosellen Sullivan, argued Norris is not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder.

Crown prosecutors Iain Hollett and Jeff Summers in their case tried to prove Norris knew the consequences of her actions and planned to kill Reardon.

The six men and six woman of the jury were sequestered on Thursday at around 4:30 p.m., and deliberated that day for just about an hour and a half.

Supreme Court Justice William Goodridge appears in court on Feb. 13, 2018, in the Anne Norris first-degree murder trial. (Glenn Payette/CBC)

They came back with questions for Justice William Goodridge on Friday morning, seeking clarification on the definition of hearsay as it related to comments Norris made to Dr. Nizar Ladha, who did an assessment of Norris for the defence.

Jurors also asked what state of mind meant, and how it differed from the test for not being criminally responsible.

Goodridge answered those questions around 2:30 p.m. Friday, and the jury resumed its deliberations until around 5:45 p.m.

The jury returned to their hotel rooms and will remain incommunicado — no TV, no cellphones, no social media — until they reach a verdict.

Follow the latest developments as they happen in court in our live blog.