Transportation museum's $60K sculpture draws mixed reviews

The City of Moncton is commissioning a $60,000 sculpture that will be displayed in front of the transportation museum as part of the city's art policy.

Le Mascaret — the Tidal Bore — will be unveiled when new museum opens in 2014

A new public art display in Moncton will be a tribute to the tidal bore. 2:17

The City of Moncton is commissioning a $60,000 sculpture that will be displayed in front of the transportation museum as part of the city's art policy.

One per cent of the cost of any new public building in Moncton goes towards public art — up to $200,000.  

But some people think the money could be better spent.

The new sculpture is called Le Mascaret — The Tidal Bore. It will feature granite in brown hues to reflect the Petitcodiac River.

Local artist Andre Lapointe will create the piece for Moncton's new transportation museum.

Paulette Theriault, Moncton city councillor and chair of the arts and culture committee, said public art is important and can put a stamp on the community.

"What do we remember the most? I mean New York City, the Statue of Liberty. Paris, the Eiffel Tower. And any city — even Charlottetown it's about Anne of Green Gables. So arts, public art, is about the people who make up the community," said Theriault.

But some people, like Shawn Amberman, aren't sure about the price tag.

"For sure $60,000 could be spent in different areas there and for a piece of art $60,000 I always find it's quite expensive," he said.

Matthew Arsenault has a different view.

"Things that are beautiful enhance life quality, quality of life in an area and they generally I think make people happier and therefore perhaps more productive," he said.

Theriault said the price of the sculpture was part of the budget for Resurgo Place.

Le Mascaret will be unveiled when the new museum opens in 2014.

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