Theatre New Brunswick artistic director is leaving after 3 years

Thomas Morgan Jones, the artistic director at Theatre New Brunswick for the past three years, is leaving for a new job in Winnipeg.

Thomas Morgan Jones takes new job with Manitoba theatre company

Thomas Morgan Jones is leaving Theatre New Brunswick after three years as artistic director. (Submitted by Theatre New Brunswick)

Thomas Morgan Jones, artistic director at Theatre New Brunswick for three years, is leaving the Fredericton company for Manitoba.

He will become artistic director at Prairie Theatre Exchange in Winnipeg.

Jones said he's accomplished many of the goals he set for himself, allowing him to move on faster than he expected.

"Suddenly, it's three years later," he said.

Jones will become artistic director with Prairie Theatre Exchange in Winnipeg. (Matt Carter/Submitted)

Jones, who has done work for the Stratford Festival in Ontario, Theatre Direct and Theatre Passe Muraille in Toronto and the Charlottetown Festival, among other organizations, said he thinks it is dangerous to stay in an area just because he has a job there.

"If you're going to stay anywhere for longer than three years, you should really question why," he said in an interview with Information Morning Fredericton.

Ayesha Mansur-Gonsalves and Emily Barker rehearse Laurier, created and directed by Jones about the life and times of former prime minister Wilfrid Laurier. Jones can be seen directing in the background. (Matt Carter/Submitted)

But Thomas said he is conflicted about leaving New Brunswick. Theatre New Brunswick is like a family, he said, and it will be hard to leave.

He'll miss his community but most of all he'll miss "the natural beauty of the province," Thomas said. "It's astonishing, and constantly takes my breath away."

He said he's leaving a healthy environment for theatre, which is continuing to grow.

Under his leadership, Theatre New Brunswick opened a 100-seat Fredericton theatre, which has hosted shows, workshops and music.

TNB has also been able to showcase many more New Brunswick playwrights, including the work of more women, Jones said.

"The two names that spring immediately to mind as playwrights are Ryan Griffith and Natalie Sappier," he said. "They've both established themselves as a force in their own right, but I think these are two of the voices that will help define the next wave of theatre in the province."

With files from Information Morning Fredericton