The winter storm that swept through New Brunswick Thursday night dumped 20 to 38 centimetres of snow and in some places freezing rain and rain.

Late Friday morning, Environment Canada removed the last of its winter storm warnings for the province.

The agency reported the highest snowfall amounts were near central New Brunswick, with Gagetown receiving the most snow at 38 centimetres.

There was also extreme rain over southern parts of the province, including Grand Manan, which received 34 millimetres of rain.

Driving conditions in New Brunswick remained hazardous Friday morning. Highways were snow or slush-covered with reduced visibility.

"Our roads are slushy right now and they're snow-covered in some places. It's still snowing in Oromocto, but it's raining in Moncton, so there's rain and rain pellets in between," said Ross Mathers, spokesman for MRDC Operations, the company that maintains the Trans Canada in the eastern half of the province.

"In places it's poor visibility with blowing snow and driving conditions," "And, as you know, snow means slow, so the speeds probably reduced quite a bit right now, between 70 and 80 km/hr."

Colleen Gorman, spokeswoman with Brunway, the company that maintains the Trans-Canada Highway from the Quebec border to just outside of Fredericton, reported high winds, drifting and poor visibility.

"There's some squall areas … and, surprisingly, we've had some freezing rain in different spots this morning, so the driving conditions are pretty miserable."

Meanwhile, power outages were few overnight, but started to creep up with the strong wind and freezing rain Friday morning. As of 1:42 p.m., NB Power said 154 customers were without service, mainly in the St. Stephen area.

There were also several delays and cancellations at New Brunswick airports.