Storm Arthur leaves 33,000 still without power

NB Power is continuing to reconnect electricity to tens of thousands of customers, particularly in southern New Brunswick, five days after post-tropical storm Arthur slammed into the province.

Fredericton remains the hardest-hit region for power outages

NB Power is continuing to reconnect electricity to tens of thousands of customers, particularly in southern New Brunswick, five days after post-tropical storm Arthur slammed into the province.

As of Wednesday 9:45 p.m. AT, NB Power reported there were still more than 36,000 customers waiting to have their power restored.

NB Power has said it expects to have 80 per cent of affected customers back online by 11 p.m. Wednesday. The remaining 20 per cent should have their power back on by the weekend, officials have said.

Fredericton remains the hardest hit region. There were almost 20,000 customers in the capital city area who were without electricity.

Other major power outages remained in parts of southern New Brunswick. There were 5,202 customers without power in Woodstock, 4,015 in St. Stephen, 2,471 in Rothesay and 794 in Miramichi.

NB Power estimated that 140,000 customers were without electricity on Saturday during the height of the blackout. That's more than one-third of the utility's 394,585 accounts.

Arthur has been blamed for creating the largest blackout in New Brunswick’s history.

The ongoing blackout has prompted neighbours and local organizations to find ways to help people who were in need.

Lance Minard stood next to a toppled tree at the foot of his driveway in Grafton, nine kilometres west of Woodstock, on Tuesday.

He said his entire road was a mess until he took matters into his own hands.

"I took my chainsaw personally to clear the road, every 30, 40 feet you had a tree down on the road. I cut the trees off and hauled them off with my truck," he said.

Once he finished clearing the road to his home, Minard hauled his RV to his father-in-law’s house to use the electricity. Minard is still without power even though many of his neighbours have seen their lights come back on.

"I just look up over the hill and and they've got power here and the main route has power and obviously I'm less than a quarter of a mile away and I don't have power, so it's kind of frustrating should I say, yeah, very frustrating," he said.

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