Dennis Griffin Stands on Griffin Lane, a private road he wants to develop for his children

Dennis Griffin Stands on Griffin Lane, a private road he wants to develop for his children (CBC News)

A Red Head resident says Saint John city council has denied his application to subdivide his land because it is making way for industrial projects, such as the proposed Energy East pipeline.

Dennis Griffin owns 15 hectares near the area a marine terminal for the Energy East pipeline would go, if approved.

He says the city is using his undeveloped land to maintain a required buffer zone around what is hoped will be a growing industrial zone.

"What they're doing is they're saying the only development that's going to take place in Red Head right now is going to be industrial," he says.

Public hearings slated for September will examine proposed by-law changes which would rezone Griffin's property designation from one and two family suburban residential or RS 2, to Rural — which restricts residential development.

Griffin gave a piece of his property to a son almost a decade ago. In 2011, he applied to do the same for a daughter but was denied.

Red Head will be surrounded by industrial developments on three sides if all the proposed changes go through.

Coun. Susan Fullerton says she’s supporting residents in the debate.

"I think we have to have some provision for those people," says Fullerton.

"I'd really like us to have something, or be working on something, so that these folks can be made happy."

The proposed Energy East pipeline would see Alberta crude transported to refineries in Saint John.

The proposed Energy East pipeline would see Alberta crude transported to refineries in Saint John. (TransCanada Corp.)

The Energy East pipeline is a proposed 4,600 kilometre line which would carry more than a million barrels of oil a day to Quebec and Saint John. The project includes a proposed $300-million Irving deep-water marine terminal.