nb-hanwell-road

Several businesses and a mini-home park line the twisty road into Fredericton, making the Hanwell Road dangerous for both drivers and pedestrians in the area. (CBC)

A project to repair a major commuter road that leads to Fredericton appears to have stalled because of funding problems.

The Hanwell Road was ranked as the worst road in New Brunswick and one of the worst in Atlantic Canada by a recent Canadian Automobile Association survey.

In June, Progressive Conservative MLA Carl Urquhart, who represents the York riding, said the New Brunswick government was planning on spending $4.4 million to upgrade the road.

Urquhart expected surveyors would be out this summer to start planning the project, which will add more three-lane sections for easier access to business and residential areas, as well as sidewalks and wider shoulders.

However, Peter Flower, the former president of the New Brunswick Road Builders Association, said the project is now stagnant.

'I don't think we want to wait until a child runs out in front of a car by the mini-home park.' —Peter Flower, former president, N.B. Road Builders Association

"My understanding is that it's on hold," said Flower. "I did talk to the designer here about a week and a half ago and was told it's on hold."

Project on hold for budget reasons, says Urquhart

Urquhart admits that money and the budgeting process are holding the project back.

"It is on hold, as far as their end of it is. First of all the property needs to be bought," he said.

"The approval needs to go through budget, because this work we're doing right now is not approved budgeting."

Urquhart said fixing the road has been a top priority for him since he was elected in 2006.

Now it seems the earliest the improvements will happen is late in 2016.

Hanwell Road is extremely busy as it serves as a major commuter route for people coming into Fredericton to work.

There are also businesses lining the road and large vehicles often travelling along the twisty route.

Flower said it is only a matter of time before someone gets injured or killed in the high traffic area.

"I don't think we want to wait until a child runs out in front of a car by the mini-home park," he said.