After four years away, one stitch of Canadian history has returned to the Kings County Museum in Hampton.

The Confederation Quilt, sewn from pieces of gowns made for the galas of the Charlottetown Conference in 1864, was delivered to the museum yesterday after a failed attempt last week.

"It's a great pleasure to get it back," said Richard Brown, former president of the Kings County Historical Society. "We were concerned about getting it in here."

Five years ago, the quilt was verified to be of national interest. After that, it was taken to be restored by the Canadian Conservation Institute.

On Thursday, movers learned the crate the quilt was delivered in was too big, as they were unable to get it into the museum.

It was placed in climate-controlled storage at McIntyre's Moving & Storage in Saint John until a plan was devised.

The quilt entered the museum Monday afternoon after the larger outer crate was removed, revealing another smaller box inside.

Quilt 2

The quilt entered the museum Monday afternoon after the larger outer crate was removed, revealing another smaller box inside. (Joseph Tunney/CBC)

The quilt was sewn by dressmaker Fannie Parlee, who died in 1915.

The artifact came into the museum's possession after somebody who had married the grandchild of Parlee brought it in.

"I'm assuming [Parlee and her family] just used it as a quilt," Brown said.

What amazes Brown is that Parlee had the foresight to know that making a quilt out of those dresses would be worthwhile.

He said what's equally amazing is the quilt was preserved as well as it was for 152 years.

For Brown, the return of the crate is just in time.

He'd like to use it to celebrate Canada's 150th anniversary.

"It's a mosaic. There's all these little pieces. It's just like Canada," said Brown.

"You have all the diversity and you put it together and you have the country. I think the quilt, with all the historical value to it, displays that wonderfully."