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Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Claude Williams said the four buildings that were bought next to the Petitcodiac River will be sold.

The New Brunswick government wants to recoup some of the $1.3 million it spent buying four homes along the Petitcodiac River in 2013.

The houses were purchased more than a year ago over fears of future flooding along the southeastern river.

The provincial government put the four houses, which must be removed from the land, on the market and three have already been sold.

Transportation and Infrastructure Minister Claude WIlliams said the houses should be moved by June and when that process has been wrapped up, the land will be sold as well.

"Once…the removal has been completed, the rehabilitation of the property, we would put that for tender and if there's no takers then it's being advertised on our website so then anybody can come and make us an offer,” William said.

Petitcodiac house sale

The New Brunswick government wants to recoup some of the money it spent buying out four homes along the Petitcodiac River in 2013. This building is now for sale, but it must be removed from the property. (Government of New Brunswick)

The final listing on the provincial government’s website estimated the value of the 68-square-metre (728-square-foot) home, which was built in 1951, and its 45-square-metre (484 square foot) garage at $20,000.

The building is located on Coverdale Road in Riverview.

Land will be appraised

Williams said the land on the four properties would have to be appraised before it’s sold. The infrastructure minister said it is not clear what could be built on those properties in the future.

"The first thing would have to be the regional planning commission to get all of that information because you would need to have the proper permit through environment, health and if it's municipal or other,” he said.

Williams said once the land is sold, the provincial government will not have any responsibility when it comes to flooding and erosion in the future.

The four properties were located on the former head pond, which was drained after the provincial government opened the causeway gates in 2010.

The four houses were considered to be at risk of flooding, after the provincial government assessed 700 properties along the Petitcodiac River.