The New Brunswick election campaign still isn't officially underway, but signs and ads from candidates have been popping up in the Fredericton area.

Troy Lifford political sign sign

Progressive Conservative Troy Lifford put a political sign up in Fredericton before Canada Day. Elections New Brunswick says these signs are legal. (Daniel McHardie/CBC)

Over the holiday weekend, signs of Progressive Conservative MLAs on the city's north side weren't asking for votes, but were wishing residents a happy New Brunswick Day.

Similar signs also appeared around Canada Day, leading many people on social media to question whether such signs are permitted.

Nathan Phillips, assistant supervisor of political financing for Elections New Brunswick, says there's nothing illegal about the pre-writ advertising.

Political parties are allowed to spend a certain amount on advertising each year, whether there's an election coming or not, he said.

No content restrictions

"Under the political parties' advertising limits, you would have seen, for example, an advertisement on television introducing the leader of one of the political parties. So that would fall under their $35,000 limit," he said.

"You could also see vehicles being wrapped, with an advertisement on the side of the van."

In addition, there's no restriction on the content of pre-writ advertising, said Phillips.

Candidates can use the signs to ask for votes, if they so choose, he said.

In May, the two main political parties were buying advertising time on TV and radio, test-driving messages they plan to take into the election campaign.

One Progressive Conservative ad targeted the Liberal stance on a shale gas moratorium as perpetuating the need to go west for work

Liberal Leader Brian Gallant's ad, meanwhile, served as an introduction to him, describing a humble background.

The provincial election is scheduled for Sept. 22.