Some schools in New Brunswick are now into their third week of days lost to weather closures, but there are currently no plans to extend the school year to make up lost time.

With a second straight snow day on Tuesday, some schools in New Brunswick have now lost 11 days of class time to weather closures in 2013-14.

All schools in New Brunswick have lost at least six days to weather closures. Many schools have nine or 10 snow day closures to date.

The Anglophone West school district has been the hardest hit this year. All of its schools have had at least seven days of closures. Many of its schools have had up to 10 days lost. Schools in Chipman, Minto, Coles Island and Cambridge Narrows have had 11 days of classes cancelled.

Anglophone West school district superintendent David McTimoney says there is no move yet by the Department of Education to extend the school year.

"I'm sure that it's something people have thought about," said McTimoney. "We haven't been invited to enter into formal discussions regarding that at this time."

"It's something I'm sure that would be on the radar, but not at a point yet where we've been invited to sit down at the table and look at options such as that."

McTimoney says any initiative to extend the school year, or have students attend class on designated professional development days for teachers, would probably come from the Department of Education, he said.

'Teachers may have to take advantage of other opportunities during the school day that they may have been planning for other activities just to try to make sure that the essential things are taught.'- Anglophone East Supt. Gregg Ingersoll

Any such initiative would have to be done in collaboration with the New Brunswick Teachers' Federation and other unions representing employees in the school system, said McTimoney.

"We have to respect our collective agreements with teachers and educational assistants and the other workers within our system."

In 2012-13, the number of weather closures in Anglophone West ranged ranged from six to eight days, said McTimoney.

"It's a little bit high this year," said McTimoney.

The Education department sets the curriculum for the province and McTimoney says it's up to teachers to follow the curriculum and help students achieve the designated outcomes.

"I know that teachers in our schools are continuing forward with their responsibilities with trying to maintain those meaningful lessons in the classroom and they are adjusting their timelines," said McTimoney.

"Needless to say, when you miss this many days, there is a need for adjustment there."

Students in the Anglophone East school district have now missed nine days of classes because of weather.

Anglophone East superintendent Gregg Ingersoll says that is the highest number for the district in the past decade.

"We still have three months left in this school year so there is some time for teachers to readjust," he said.

Ingersoll says teachers will be reviewing their curriculum and will make changes if necessary.

"Students may have to do a bit more work outside the classroom," he said.

"Teachers may have to take advantage of other opportunities during the school day that they may have been planning for other activities just to try to make sure that the essential things are taught."

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(CBC)