New Brunswick farm bringing quail eggs to region

Marc St-Onge of Saint-Jacques owns M&M Quail Farm and became interested in the small, pigeon-sized birds several years ago.

Quail eggs are less than half the size of chicken eggs and just as delicious

Marc St-Onge pickles his quail eggs in vinegar, Cajun spice and hot peppers. (Facebook)

Quail aren't native to New Brunswick, but one man has made a business selling their eggs in the province.

Marc St-Onge of Saint-Jacques owns M&M Quail Farm and became interested in the small, pigeon-sized birds several years ago.

"I thought they were quite interesting and I did a bit more research on them. I thought I would make them available to the people in my area."

"People are just surprised to find them in our area, they didn't realize they could get this type of product in this region."

The eggs are less than half the size of a chicken egg with a spotted shell.

"They're very close to a chicken egg … but a little bit creamier. There's more yolk percentage compared to a chicken egg," said St-Onge.

St-Onge said there are several types of quail but the ones which are most common are the coturnix quail or Japanese quail.

"I have about 75 birds. In the winter time I don't have access to local markets like I do in the summertime … n the summertime I usually have well over 150 birds."

The tiny eggs contain more protein than a chicken egg, contain HDL cholesterol and more iron.

"If I'm going to eat an egg I might as well eat a quail egg. Instead of eating two I end up eating six. The health benefits that keep me coming back."

St-Onge is also looking into sharing his knowledge of the tiny birds through summer seminars.

"With the demand that is there … more and more so there are people coming to me and asking if I have different things on the go," he said. "I love talking about these things it's definitely an interest of mine."

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