New Brunswick's economy lost 1,100 jobs in January

New Brunswick's unemployment rate jumped to 9.3 per cent in January as the economy shed 1,100 jobs, according to Statistics Canada.

Statistics Canada reported that New Brunswick lost 4,600 full-time jobs, gained 3,500 part-time jobs

Statistics Canada has released the monthly labour force report on Friday morning. New Brunswick's unemployment rate is up to 9.3 per cent. (Ryan Remiorz/Canadian Press)

New Brunswick's unemployment rate jumped to 9.3 per cent in January as the economy shed 1,100 jobs, according to Statistics Canada.

The monthly labour force report showed the province lost 4,600 full-time jobs to start 2016 and gained 3,500 part-time jobs.

The overall unemployment rate rose to 9.3 per cent up from 8.9 per cent in December.

It has been a gloomy month for the New Brunswick economy.

Potash Corp. announced on Jan. 19 that it was suspending its operations in Sussex and cutting 430 jobs at its mine.

On Tuesday, the New Brunswick released its provincial budget, which included a promise to shed 1,300 civil service jobs in five years and many other mergers and cost-cutting initiatives.

The province has received a mixed bag of results in recent labour force reports.

The province added 300 jobs in December but saw the jobless rate inch up to 8.9 per cent, according to last month's report.

The participation rate, which is the number of adults in the labour force or actively trying to get a job, of 62.3, which is lower than provinces with stronger economies.

Unemployment has consistently been higher in northern New Brunswick.

Meanwhile, the Canadian economy also lost jobs in January.

Overall, the country shed 5,700 jobs last month and the unemployment rate inched up to 7.2 per cent.

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