Moncton seeks to remove electronic billboard

A large, LED sign is prompting Moncton councillors to press city staff to find a way to remove the controversial electronic billboard that sparked a petition from angry neighbours.

Neighbours complain the LED sign is a nuisance

Moncton councillors are press city staff to find a way to remove a controversial electronic billboard that sparked a petition from angry neighbours. (Marc Genuist/CBC)

A large, LED sign is prompting Moncton councillors to press city staff to find a way to remove the controversial electronic billboard that sparked a petition from angry neighbours.

The sign is located at the intersection of Mountain Road and Bromley Avenue and nearby residents say it has become a nuisance in the neighbourhood.

Carole Chan brought a 120-name petition to council on Monday complaining the billboard lights up the neighbourhood, especially at night.

“It's bright enough that the neighbour across the street can't watch television at night,” Chan said.

Chan said the large sign also diverts drivers’ attentions away from a nearby crosswalk that is often used by children.

“You can see the sign a lot better than the pedestrian crossing sign,” she said.

City staff have said there is nothing they can do about it because the sign was put up before the city was able to bring in a bylaw to regulate them.

However, Chan says the city has an old bylaw that protects people from nuisances, such as bright lights.

Councillors told staff to figure out how to get rid of the billboard.

Coun. Charles Leger said he wants something done about the electronic billboard.

“I don't like them they're too bright and very intrusive,” he said.

City staff indicated they are working on a bylaw to regulate future signs from going up in Moncton.

The councillors say that's a start, but they also want staff to listen to the residents and have this one declared a nuisance and removed.

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