Fredericton's newest traffic pilot will be modified next week with new signs being added to alert motorists and pedestrians to the ban on right turns on red lights.

Signs are already in place at the six intersections affected by the traffic experiment, but there have been complaints that they are hard to see and many motorists are ignoring them altogether.

Darren Charters, the city's traffic engineer, said feedback from police helped the city to make its decision to add new signs.

si-nb-charters-sign-220

Darren Charters, a traffic engineer, said the new signs will be closer to the sidewalk. (CBC)

"People say they have not seen the signs," he said.

"What I think is happening is people are seeing the signs but not registering what they mean."

Either way, people aren't stopping at the intersections when the light is red. The hope is that the new signs will be obvious enough that motorists will abide by the new bylaw.

The current signage is located near the traffic light, so high that many drivers may not see them, Charters said.

The new signs will be located closer to the sidewalk.

"They're going to be more in the driver's line of sight," he said.

"You will see it as you approach the intersection, not while you're at the intersection. We just think it really stands out a lot better."

‘Not sure it’s a great idea’

Some pedestrians are worried that even with the new signage, the city's pilot project will still fail.

"I haven't noticed it much in my travels. I'm not sure it's a great idea to have the traffic stop that long," said Alan Lynch.

He said if the city expects pedestrians and motorists to abide by the rules, it should be indicated in a way that's obvious.

Rebecca Morrison has been duped by the new rule, along with many of her motorist counterparts.  She said she's one of the drivers police observed breaking the law.

"It's just because I wasn't used to it, but I just found out. The signs are sometimes hard to see or you're not looking up if you're not used to them," she said.

The project has cost approximately $5,000. The ban will remain in place for a year.

Then the city will evaluate the project's effectiveness and will decide whether to keep the bylaw permanently.

li-nb-red-light-ban-620

Fredericton has prohibited drivers from making right turns on red lights at six intersections in the city. (City of Fredericton)