Garbage business booms as flood cleanup escalates

Traffic to the Crane Mountain Landfill in Saint John has begun to swell with dumpsters full of flood-contaminated debris arriving from damaged households and local businesses.

The Saint John-area landfill is extending its hours, waiving tipping fees

Crane Mountain Landfill has extended its hours and waived tipping fees to accommodate flood-affected property owners. (Brian Chisholm/CBC)

Traffic to the Crane Mountain Landfill in Saint John has begun to swell with dumpsters full of flood-contaminated debris arriving from damaged households and local businesses.

"Typically on an average day we get about 210, 220 vehicles coming through," said general manager Marc MacLeod.

"Yesterday, we had 615."

Marc MacLeod, general manager of the Crane Mountain Landfill, said almost triple the traffic average came through the landfill on Monday. (Brian Chisholm/CBC)

Some of those trucks belong to Matthew Joyce, owner of JTR Dumpster Services, a private dumpster rental service.

On Tuesday afternoon, he was coming from the Saint John Marina, where the river had flooded the main floor up to a depth of three feet.

"This is some drywall and insulation, probably the fourth or fifth load today, coming out of that place," said Joyce.

The company is running with five trucks on the road and 75 containers out for rent, and Joyce said he still has a waiting list.

Matthew Joyce, owner of JTR Dumpster Services, said his company has been busy since the flood and the workload will remain high some time. (Brian Chisholm/CBC)

"I think for several months there will be lots and lots of tear-outs," he said.

"I don't see an end in the near future."

Dumpsters were also arriving Tuesday from the Kennebecasis Valley.

The towns of Rothesay and Quispamsis have encouraged affected residents to use them before contaminated materials start to grow mildew and mould.'

Betty and Jim Evans live in Grand Bay-Westfield. They were speaking to the CBC reporter Rachel Cave, and videographer, Brian Chisholm. 6:35

The extra volume comes at a time when the regional landfill's seventh cell is reaching the end of its capacity.

MacLeod said it won't be a problem. He said there should be enough space for all the flooding debris from 2018 and the eighth cell is almost ready.

The Crane Mountain Landfill begins its extended hours on Saturday. It will close Sunday, but open again on Victoria Day.

The Crane Mountain Landfill in Saint John has seen a dramatic increase in the amount of garbage since the flood. (Brian Chisholm/CBC)

Access to disaster assistance has allowed the dump to waive its tipping fees for everyone.

"The reason for it is that they want people to put the debris in the right place," said MacLeod.

The province has discouraged property owners from burning any contaminated waste or dumping it illegally.

As of Tuesday, the entire province was under a burn ban.