The RCMP announcement of an internal review into the June 4 shooting spree in Moncton that left three Mounties dead and two others wounded isn't quelling calls for an independent inquiry.

One of those calling for an independent review is Darryl Davies, a criminologist from Carleton University, who was hired by the RCMP in 2009 to look at whether its officers should have access to high-powered rifles.

Davies was hired by the RCMP four years after four Mounties were killed by a gunman in Mayerthorpe, Alta. His report concluded the RCMP needed high-powered rifles and training for all officers immediately.

'I think an internal inquiry is not going to be transparent, number one — that's why we need a public inquiry.'- Darryl Davies, Carleton University criminologist

Davies says his report was ignored and he's afraid nothing with change with an internal review.

"I think an internal inquiry is not going to be transparent, number one — that's why we need a public inquiry," said Davies.

"Two, we didn't learn anything of significance from Mayerthorpe."

RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson has ordered an internal review of the Moncton shootings to be headed by retired assistant commissioner Phonse MacNeil, formerly of H Division in Nova Scotia.

"Clearly the death of our three members in the course of duty and the near deaths of many others demand that we seek to funnily understand the facts, learn from them and if required, change our practices promptly," said Paulson in an internal announcement of the review on June 25 that was posted publicly by the RCMP on Thursday.

"The scope of this review will be wide ranging and include such areas as whether the accused's actions could reasonably have been foreseen; our initial and longer term response, our training; our tactics; our support for our employees and families; and our equipment," said Paulson. 

"In short, all aspects of this terrible incident."

Constables Douglas James Larche, 40, Dave Joseph Ross, 32, and Fabrice Georges Gevaudan, 45, were shot and killed June 4 when responding to a call of a heavily armed man walking through a Moncton neighborhood. Constables Éric Stéphane J. Dubois and Marie Darlene Goguen were wounded.

'It sends red flags up'

Terry McKee, a recently retired member of the Codiac detachment, also says the RCMP should not be allowed to review itself in the case of the Moncton shootings.

"That they can just simply turn around and so, 'No, we're good enough to investigate this on our own' — how can a company investigate their own shortcomings?" said McKee.

"It sends red flags up. It's just inappropriate as far as I'm concerned and I believe the public is behind me on this."

Robert Creasser of the Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada said he also wants an independent review.

'I have no faith in a former senior executive of the RCMP investigating the current senior executive of the RCMP.'- Robert Creasser, Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada

"I have no faith in a former senior executive of the RCMP investigating the current senior executive of the RCMP," said Creasser.

Creasser said he believes the Moncton detachment and others in the country are understaffed and lack equipment and says that has been ignored by senior executives in the force.

The association headed by Creasser represents about 2,000 of the estimated 18,000 Mounties across the country.

Justin Christien Bourque, 24, has been charged with three counts of first-degree murder and two counts of attempted murder. A defence request for a psychiatric assessment of Bourque was approved by provincial court judge Irwin Lampert on Thursday.

Bourque is schedule to return to court on July 31.