Many New Brunswick drivers are finding it difficult to navigate roads across the province and it’s not only potholes that are causing a problem.

Lanes are hardly visible on many routes and they are making some stretches difficult and even dangerous for drivers.

Sandy MacDonald said the fading paint on the Saint John Harbour Bridge makes it tough to find the lanes when he's driving.

"Wore off with the salt and I think the abrasion of the plows going by and the everyday traffic. And it makes it hard for, I think, older people especially where they can't see the lines as well as when we're younger," he said.

Missing road paint

The Department of Transportation and Infrastructure spends $2.5 million annually on re-striping roads and highways. The paint, however, rarely lasts more than a year, especially on some of the province's busiest roads and highways. (CBC)

The Department of Transportation and Infrastructure pays more than $2.5 million to re-stripe roads every year, not including routes 1 and 2, which are subcontracted out to private companies.

Most of the paint is environmentally friendly but being water-based, it rarely lasts more than a year, especially on the province's busiest roads and highways.

"The paint used for highway striping eventually wears down as a result of the wear and tear from vehicle traffic as well as the effects of necessary winter maintenance activities," said a spokesperson with the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure.

The provincial government only uses oil-based paint in cold weather. The bulk of road work is completed during the summer months, so it seems unlikely many fresh painted lanes this year will survive the winter.