Controversial kiss increases interest in Moncton university

University of Moncton's director of communications says he has no regrets about the controversial recruitment ad that shows two students kissing in the library.

The ad that sparked debate has nearly 170,000 views on YouTube as of Monday morning

The University of Moncton's director of communications says he has no regrets about the controversial recruitment ad that shows two students kissing in the library.

Marc Angers says the 30-second video that has sparked debate across the country was intended to appeal to a target audience between 16 and 18 years of age.

"Oh, this is great," Angers said of the interest that has been generated among that target audience.

"Research told us they were looking at lifestyle when they were choosing post-secondary education."

The ad was launched less than a week ago and on Monday morning had nearly 170,000 views on YouTube.

The ad drew criticism from some at the university, including the president of the professors' and librarians' association who called it "pathetic" and said it was "selling the university like it's a beer product."

Angers says the ad is a balance between academics and lifestyle at the University of Moncton.

"The role of an ad is to leave an impression or a feeling so people … hopefully they go to the second move and request information."

Angers says from his perspective the ad has been working, with the number of inquiries up substantially in the past week.

"It's hard to please everybody, everybody has an opinion about an ad so what is important is they talk about the ad and actually it's beyond our expectations," Angers said.

He says the university has received requests from as far away as Maine, and he will be surprised if the interest doesn't translate into an increase in enrolment.

The ad will continue to run on television until the end of March, and will be followed by a print campaign.

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