A small, local business owner in Bathurst has come up with a way he hopes will increase customers, and help other area stores as well.

Antique store owner Curtis Daigle is offering discounts to customers if they bring in a receipt from another local business.

Daigle says he was looking for a way to boost sales at Antiques and Vintage once the snow flies.


Curtis Daigle offers a 15% discount to customers who produce a receipt of $10 or more from another locally-owned business. (CBC)

"In the winter, it's far more important because we don't have the tourism," he said. "I'm getting the people from Tracadie, Campbellton every now and then."

Daigle's solution was to promote himself, by promoting all the local shops.

'Growing up here, I think of the small local merchants.'
- Noah Gastellum, Cultures Skateboard Shop

"The idea is that if you buy from a local business, grocery store, corner store, etc., I'll give you 15 per cent off anything in the store instantly," he said. "If it can help me get a little attention from those stores that may mention me to someone that doesn't know me, or just help me sell an item, I'm perfectly happy."

The winter months can be very slow in the city.

Once the holiday rush is over, foot traffic goes way down until the snow melts, says Noah Gastellum, who owns Cultures Skateboard Shop in the downtown.

"Some days we have two or three people who come in the entire day," he said. "So every sale is important."

Keep the cash in the community

Gastellum says it's key for people in the area to shop local.


Skateboard shop owner Noah Gastellum says when people shop local, they are not just supporting the store, they are supporting the whole community. (CBC)

"People from Bathurst should be more concerned about the movement of our money," he said. "When you shop locally you're not only supporting the local merchant but you're supporting your community, because the money is cycled back through the community."

There's a bit of hometown pride too.

"When I look back growing up here, I think of the small local merchants," said Gastellum. "That's a big aspect of what makes Bathurst for me."

Gastellum agrees with Daigle that it's a lot more important for local merchants to work together than to compete.