The federal election takes place Monday, Oct. 19 and you must prove your identity and address in order to register and vote.

The Fair Elections Act removed removed the ability to use a voter identification card as a way to prove where one lives.

Now, voters must show proof of their identity and current address in order to vote — and can only vote at the polling station that corresponds to that address.

Here are a few things you should know about voter identification options when you are voting in person — at an Elections Canada office, at advance polls or on election day.

  • Photo identification  is not required — but government-issued photo ID that has an address on it, like a driver's licence or territorial identification card is best because that's all you need.

  • If you don't have government photo ID, you can use two pieces of acceptable ID as long as one of them bears a current address in the polling area you are trying to vote in. This could be your health card, passport, Indian status card, bank statement or correspondence issued by a school, college or university.

  • If you don't have ID with your address, you can show two pieces of ID with your name and swear an oath and have someone else who lives in the same polling division and who does have the proper ID can vouch that you live there. They can do this for only one person.

  • Elections Canada accepts expired identification, as long as it has your name and current address.

  • If you stay in a shelter: Print the letter of confirmation of residence form, if you can, and ask the administrator to complete it and sign it. We will also accept a letter from the administrator that is printed on the shelter's letterhead. When you go vote, bring the letter and a second piece of ID with your name.