Spotlight on Montreal ridings: Bourassa

​The former riding of former MP turned Montreal mayor, Denis Coderre, Bourassa has been Liberal since Coderre first secured it for the party in 1997.

North-end riding has stayed prominently Liberal for nearly 50 years

The riding includes part of the borough of Ahuntsic-Cartierville as well as the borough of Montreal North. (Elections Canada)

​The former riding of former MP turned Montreal mayor, Denis Coderre, Bourassa has been Liberal since Coderre first secured it for the party in 1997.

In the last federal election in 2011, Coderre took 41 per cent of the vote in Bourassa. The NDP candidate finished second with 32 per cent and the Bloc Québécois finished third at 15 per cent.

When Coderre stepped down to enter the mayoral race in 2013,  Emmanuel Dubourg once again secured it for the Liberals in a byelection, taking in 48 per cent of the vote. 

While the riding has been dominated by Liberal representation for the majority of its nearly 50 year history, voters also chose a Progressive Conservative MP in 1988 and a Bloc Québécois MP in 1993. Both served single terms and were defeated while seeking re-election. 

The riding, situated in the northern portion of the Island of Montreal, includes part of the borough of Ahuntsic-Cartierville as well as the borough of Montreal North. 

Nearly a third of the residents of the borough identified as being of Haitian origin in the 2011 National Household Survey. 

Riding History

  • Established in 1966.
  • Liberal since 1997.

Riding snapshot

Population: 100,295 (2011 Census) 

Mother tongue: French (54.9 per cent), English (3.9 per cent), Non-official languages (39.1 per cent, largest linguistic groups are Creole, Italian and Arabic)

Average household income: $56,348 (2011 National Household Survey)

Results last election (2013 byelection)

Liberal  8,825
NDP 5,766
Bloc Québécois  2,387
Conservative  852 
Green 368
Rhinoceros 140 

Candidates 2015

See other key ridings

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