A century gone by: Seniors celebrate 100th birthday in Côte Saint-Luc

Over the weekend, nine seniors celebrated turning 100 this year in the company of their family, friends and contemporaries.

In total, the Waldorf private seniors' home boasts 20 residents in the centenarian club

Mike Levine, 101, and Irene Klein, 100, have passed the centennial mark. (Radio-Canada)

The venerable residents of the Waldorf private seniors' home in Côte Saint-Luc are among some of the oldest people in the world.

Over the weekend, nine seniors celebrated turning 100 this year in the company of their family, friends and contemporaries. The oldest resident at the centre turned 105 today.

In total, there are 20 seniors over the age of 100 at the Waldorf.

The Waldorf seniors' residence organized the event to honour 20 residents all over the age of 100. (Radio-Canada)

And while spending a century on Earth is certifiably a big deal, not all of the residents were too concerned about the big 1-0-0.

"It feels like any other birthday," said Irene Klein, who turned 100 in January. "I don't feel old."

Klein's secret to long life? The holy trinity, of sorts.

"I believe in nutrition, activity and God above," she said.

Another centenarian is the always-smiling, 101-year-old Mike Levine.

Mike Levine is a passionate bowler, even at age 101. (Radio-Canada)

He goes bowling every Monday with his friends.

Levine says he's been stuck at home with a broken foot but that he plans to get back to the lanes first chance he gets.

He says he doesn't have a secret to long life.

"People are looking after themselves better, they're living longer," he explains, but one is tempted to suggest that his real secret might be good humour.

"It only lasts so long and then, bingo!, you're gone," he said.

Francine Charbonneau, right, Quebec Minister responsible for Seniors, was at the seniors centre to celebrate the seniors. (Radio-Canada)

Minister responsible for Seniors Francine Charbonneau was in attendance at the event in celebration of longevity.

As it stands now, only 0.02 per cent of the Quebec population lives to age 100 or more.

With files from Radio-Canada's Olivier Bachand and The Canadian Press