Video

Quebec robot builders take on NASA recycling challenge

Hundreds of young robotics enthusiasts made their way down to Montreal’s École de technologie supérieure on Saturday to take on a challenge put to them by no other than NASA.

FIRST Robotics’ Recycle Rush competition participants have 6 weeks to build a lean, green recycling machine

Recycle Rush contest will have robot-building teams making a machine that can handle pool noodles and recycling bins. 1:31

Hundreds of young robotics enthusiasts made their way down to Montreal’s École de technologie supérieure on Saturday to take on a challenge put to them by no other than NASA.


Watch the above video for a quick explanation on the contest from organizer Gabriel Bran Lopez


Quebec participants in the 2015 FIRST Robotics’ Recycle Rush competition will have to build a robot capable of handling pool noodles and recycling bins, said Gabriel Bran Lopez.

Lopez, who helped organize the event, is the founding president of Fusion Jeunesse and co-founder of FIRST Robotics' Quebec chapter.

Previous events saw robots toss around Frisbees and soccer balls.

"We need to enable kids to learn whether it is mechanics, electronics, programming. They need to learn not just that they are capable of being consumers of technology, but also creators of technology," Lopez said.

Teams will have six weeks to build their recycling robots before presenting their final offering at Montreal's Uniprix Stadium from March 19 to 21 at the fourth annual Quebec Robotics Festival.

The finalists of the provincial competition will then head to the international finals in St. Louis, Missouri in April, where 25,000 young robot builders will compete for the top prize.

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