Quebec politicians set to get pay increase

Quebec politicians might soon be getting a pay raise, but in exchange they would not be able to collect severance pay if they leave office early.

Both government and opposition believe so-called golden parachute bonus should be eliminated

Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard says it's time to eliminate severance pay for politicians in the province. (Jacques Boissinot/Canadian Press)

Quebec politicians might soon be getting a pay raise, but in exchange they would not be able to collect severance pay if they leave office early.

Premier Philippe Couillard's government is expected introduce a bill in the current parliamentary session that would include putting an end to the so-called golden parachute — the pay handed out to national assembly members who leave before the end of their term.

Félix Rhéaume, a spokesman for Government House Leader Jean-Marc Fournier, said the government was already at work on the legislation and that it would be based on a 2013 report by former Supreme Court judge Claire L'Heureux Dubé.

Last week, Yves Bolduc received $155,000 after quitting politics and his education minister post, thrusting the issue back into the spotlight.

Both the government and opposition MNAs believe the bonus should be eliminated.

Couillard has called on all parties to work together in a non-partisan way to address the pay issue.

On Tuesday, François Legault, head of the Coalition Avenir Québec, said he's prepared to do that.

But he also contended the salary increase should be delayed until after the next election.

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