Prominent Quebec student protester convicted of contempt of court

One of the most prominent figures in the Quebec student revolt that gained international attention and contributed to the defeat of Jean Charest's government has been convicted of contempt of court.
In September, Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois told channel RDI that "it's legitimate for students to take the necessary means to respect the democratic choice that was made to go on strike." (The Canadian Press)

One of the most prominent figures in the Quebec student revolt that gained international attention and contributed to the defeat of Jean Charest's government has been convicted of contempt of court.

Justice Jacques Denis wrote in his ruling that Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois, the charismatic spokesman for the hardline CLASSE group, had advocated anarchy.

The case stems from allegations that Nadeau-Dubois encouraged students to ignore a court injunction obtained by student Jean-Francois Morasse that allowed him to return to class at Laval University in Quebec City.

Nadeau-Dubois said on television on May 13 that it was legitimate for protesters to form picket lines to keep students who had obtained injunctions from getting to their classrooms.

Giuseppe Sciortino, the lawyer for the student leader, pleaded ignorance on behalf of Nadeau-Dubois, saying there was no evidence beyond a reasonable doubt that he had read the injunction.

However, Quebec Superior Court rejected the argument, saying it was clear Nadeau-Dubois was aware of the injuction and used his platform to encourage non-compliance with a court order.