The Parti Québécois government says it is working hard to build bridges with anglophones, and it will keep on trying.

That's in spite of the findings of an EKOS poll commissioned by CBC that found 75 per cent of English-speaking Quebecers don't believe the PQ values the province's anglophone population.

The poll also found 51 per cent of anglophones are "angry" with the PQ.

The minister responsible for anglophone relations, Jean-François Lisée, said the resentment dates back to the PQ's first electoral victory in 1976, when it promised to give the French language a bigger place in business and politics.

"So, doing this revolution — this linguistic revolution — clearly set the stage for something that was seen as opposition between anglo Quebecers and the PQ," Lisée said.

1 per cent would vote PQ, poll finds

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Few anglophones polled by EKOS say they would vote for the PQ.

Fifty per cent say the Liberals have their vote.  The PQ is at the bottom of the list, with only 1 per cent support, lagging behind the option "other."

Liberal MNA Gerry Sklavounos says none of this should be a surprise to the governing party, after introducing new, tougher language legislation last fall, along with a promise to clamp down on religious expression in public.

"This is the kind of divisive politics the PQ likes to play, and this is the price they pay for playing divisive politics," said Sklavounos. "It's obvious that minorities and the anglophone community are worried about these positions."

'Dialogue' is key, Lisée says

Lisée says he knows the PQ remains a hard sell to English-speaking Quebecers.

"Trust is something that you can lose in a day, but that takes months or years to build," Lisée said. "So we have decided to start building it, OK?"

"Of course, we are not there yet, we have a lot of things to do. We have to keep this up: dialogue."

The EKOS poll results are based on a telephone survey conducted between Jan. 15 and Jan. 23 with a random sample of 1,001 anglophone Quebecers.

The margin of error is +/- 3.1 per cent, 19 times out of 20.